God enabled me to visit North East India from 11th to 20th October 2010 wherein I could visit Bengal, Bhutan (India’s neighbouring nation), Assam and Meghalaya. God’s grace could be felt each and every one of these days.
The first visit was to Jaigaon, a city adjacent to Bhutan. It is India’s main border with Bhutan. Pastor Bobby Mathew, who hosted me here, gave lot of first hand information about mission situation in Bhutan and also took me into the country to the border city of Phuntsholing. Here, we could visit a pastor too.

Tantric Buddhism is the religion of Bhutan. Tantric Buddhism is that sect of Buddhism that is involved in numerous magical rituals, which are mired in everything that is demonic. While there is no freedom to openly involve in evangelism and church planting, yet house churches have proliferated in the capital and some other main cities. Living costs are too much. To support a missionary in Bhutan is very expensive. People love their nation and are extremely proud of their culture. Influence of the outside world on the culture here has been minimal. This nation needs the gospel more than ever. Even the pastors working here have little or no ministry and theological training.

As I had gone there with lot of prayer, I could see God at work everywhere. In Jaigaon I met a theologically trained professional who came to the Lord from a Hindu background. He had come there from Mumbai after God started speaking to him about Bhutan. He could visit Bhutan many times and develop some contacts with local Christians. He has promised all help for us to start ministry there.

After ministering in an inter-denominational youth camp at Alipur Duar, some 50 km inland from Jaigaon, attended by about 300 youths from various churches, I travelled to Shillong in Meghalaya. Here, our missionaries arranged a meeting attended by about 30 people. Thereafter, as a team of ten people including Pr. K. Myrthong, Pr. Victor and Pr. Deepak we travelled to the remote villages of West Khasi Hills. The exhausting journey of 120 km (73 miles) through difficult mountainous terrain took us almost six hours by an SUV! In between, the jeep had to tread on stone strewn mud paths for almost 10 km!! But, the soothing natural beauty of this virgin land is worth the trouble taken in exploring it. Ministering in these areas is a challenge in itself. There is hardly any transport facility!!

Finally, we reached Maynore, the hometown of Pr. K. Myrthong. His parents hosted us for two days. Here we could conduct four sessions of revival meetings attended by about 30-50 people in each session. In this Presbyterian village this was the first time any such event was being organized. All the participants were immensely blessed through these meetings. People are utterly ignorant of the Word of God. An HMU church was inaugurated in this village. Pr. K. Myrthong was given additional charge of this infant church till a full time pastor is appointed. Our pastors have initiated some ministry among Jaintia people also. Khasi, Garo and Jaintia are three people groups in Meghalaya. Overall, the work in Meghalaya looks poised for growth.

In Guwahati (Assam), Evg. Rohit is still doing the needed groundwo
rk to plant a church. He is confident in the Lord that within a year a good congregation would be planted there.
NEW OPENINGS FOR MINISTRY IN THE NORTH EAST by PR. Shibu K. Mathai
God enabled me to visit North East India from 11th to 20th October 2010 wherein I could visit Bengal, Bhutan (India’s neighbouring nation), Assam and Meghalaya. God’s grace could be felt each and every one of these days.
The first visit was to Jaigaon, a city adjacent to Bhutan. It is India’s main border with Bhutan. Pastor Bobby Mathew, who hosted me here, gave lot of first hand information about mission situation in Bhutan and also took me into the country to the border city of Phuntsholing. Here, we could visit a pastor too.

Tantric Buddhism is the religion of Bhutan. Tantric Buddhism is that sect of Buddhism that is involved in numerous magical rituals, which are mired in everything that is demonic. While there is no freedom to openly involve in evangelism and church planting, yet house churches have proliferated in the capital and some other main cities. Living costs are too much. To support a missionary in Bhutan is very expensive. People love their nation and are extremely proud of their culture. Influence of the outside world on the culture here has been minimal. This nation needs the gospel more than ever. Even the pastors working here have little or no ministry and theological training.

As I had gone there with lot of prayer, I could see God at work everywhere. In Jaigaon I met a theologically trained professional who came to the Lord from a Hindu background. He had come there from Mumbai after God started speaking to him about Bhutan. He could visit Bhutan many times and develop some contacts with local Christians. He has promised all help for us to start ministry there.

After ministering in an inter-denominational youth camp at Alipur Duar, some 50 km inland from Jaigaon, attended by about 300 youths from various churches, I travelled to Shillong in Meghalaya. Here, our missionaries arranged a meeting attended by about 30 people. Thereafter, as a team of ten people including Pr. K. Myrthong, Pr. Victor and Pr. Deepak we travelled to the remote villages of West Khasi Hills. The exhausting journey of 120 km (73 miles) through difficult mountainous terrain took us almost six hours by an SUV! In between, the jeep had to tread on stone strewn mud paths for almost 10 km!! But, the soothing natural beauty of this virgin land is worth the trouble taken in exploring it. Ministering in these areas is a challenge in itself. There is hardly any transport facility!!

Finally, we reached Maynore, the hometown of Pr. K. Myrthong. His parents hosted us for two days. Here we could conduct four sessions of revival meetings attended by about 30-50 people in each session. In this Presbyterian village this was the first time any such event was being organized. All the participants were immensely blessed through these meetings. People are utterly ignorant of the Word of God. An HMU church was inaugurated in this village. Pr. K. Myrthong was given additional charge of this infant church till a full time pastor is appointed. Our pastors have initiated some ministry among Jaintia people also. Khasi, Garo and Jaintia are three people groups in Meghalaya. Overall, the work in Meghalaya looks poised for growth.

In Guwahati (Assam), Evg. Rohit is still doing the needed groundwork to plant a church. He is confident in the Lord that within a year a good congregation would be planted there.